Jacob Krim and the fantasies of George R. R. Martin

Fire and sword, never come into contact;
It seems that everything must grow fierce!

from Crimean poem

Many a child and childish adult have in the latest years discovered the fantasies of George R. R. Martin, but how did he himself discover them? The answer is complex, yet simple, just as Martin’s many books.

fantasies
a man of many fantasies

Some of his inspirations are obvious, and are even confirmed by Martin himself. Historical events, locations and personalities, such as the War of Roses, bloody feasts at Edinburgh castle, the terror of Peer Nerich, and the Virgin Queen have clear parallels in his books. Moreover, Martin has mentioned that something as trivial as his own turtle pets had influence on his fantasies. But are there any connections to the tales of Old Roșu?

Oh, I heard the greatest shame!
Did you hear that Raven can kill a person?

from Folanés Folly, to be read in full here

Who of us who have read Folanés Folly have not been inspired and touched? It tells of the folly of man, and the folly of Krim. In Martin’s books he draw strong parallels to the inspiring poetry from Matrice Granite. Especially in the storyline of one Jon of Snow, where crows, murder and betrayal are central.

Old Roșu inspired many
Old Roșu
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