Gregorius Nerich – Our Fable of Malevolence

There are many tales of Gregorius Nerich. Some true, most false. Rumors say that he had a close friendship with Lucifer and sold his soul to Vladimyr Tepes to gain control of the Mures valley. During his time as almighty ruler his gruesome acts did not contribute to silence those rumors. The people suffered under a inhumane laws, famine and false propositions. I am not proud to call this man a relative, however so distant.

It is said that Gregorius thrived in his almond tree gardens. His favourite activity was to linger in the shadow of an almond tree helping himself to its almonds. In many aspects of his life Gregorius was man most calm and gay. The source of his anger and evil is still unknown, but it is well known that it was real. Many believe that the great famine of 1641 was a result of Gregorius’ great love for almonds, and false propositions and conjectures throughout his reign made the people of the valley frustrated. Deceiving tautologies of Boolean algebra were the cause of despair for many scholars in the valley, and lead to countless suicides of the mind. One would call Gregorius’ acts criminal, yet people did not. It is said that the word “criminal”, or “criminale” in Romanian, had a sweet tune to the Mures townsfolk, and was hence believed to be a word of sanctuary, not evil.

It was not until the eighteen century that the Gregorian spell was abolished from all of Mures. The legend has it that this was the result from a Crimean act, a Transylvanian Circumvolution. The act falsified the beastly Nerich logic and made his electoral running time exponential. However tortoise like, Gregorius did not die and remained an important instance of the Nerich family. As legend goes he swore his return to the Mures valley and eternal anguish upon all those who disobeyed him.

Adrŷan Nerich – Historian –  Targu Mures Historical Society

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